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What is actually real in Objective Reality? How do you know? Now, prove it’s real!

Wonders Of The Universe with Professor Brian Cox

Posted by pwl on June 6, 2011

“Wonders of the Universe is a 2011 television series produced by the BBC, Discovery Channel, and Science Channel, hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Wonders of the Universe was first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC Two on 6 March 2011. The series comprises four episodes, each of which focuses on an aspect of the universe and features a ‘wonder’ relevant to the theme. It follows on from Cox’s previous series for the BBC, Wonders of the Solar System, which was first broadcast in 2010.” [1]

Why are we here? Where do we come from? These are the most enduring of questions. And it’s an essential part of human nature to want to find the answers.

We can trace our ancestry back hundreds of thousands of years to the dawn of humankind. But in reality, our story extends far, further back in time. Our story starts with the beginning of the universe. It began 13.7 billion years ago, and today, it’s filled with over a hundred billion galaxies, each containing hundreds of billions of stars.

In this series, I want to tell that story, because ultimately, we are part of the universe, so its story is our story.” —Professor Brian Cox’s opening narration

1. Destiny
In the first episode, Cox considers the nature of time. He explores the cycles of time that define the lives of humans on the earth, and compares them to the cycles of time on a cosmic scale. Cox also discusses the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics and its effect on time, and the Heat Death theory concerning the end of the universe.”


2. Stardust
In this episode, Cox discusses the elements of which all living things, including humans, are made. He explains how these elements are related to the life cycles of the stars and the recycling of matter in the Universe.”


3. Falling
This episode documents how gravity has an effect across the Universe, and how the relatively weak force creates an orbit. We also see how a neutron star’s gravity works. Finally, there is a look back at how research on gravity has enabled us to better understand the cosmos.


4. Messengers
The final episode shows how the unique properties of light provide an insight into the origins and development of mankind and the Universe. We also see how the speed of light is both a measure of time and distance. This leads on to pinpoint one of the early events in the evolution of life.”


[1] Quoted text from Wikipedia.


Professor Brian Cox talks about the large hadron collider.




Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw discuss Einstein’s famous theory, and why it matters to each and every one of us.

Prof Max Tegmark and Prof Brian Cox dicuss the fact that without the minus sign in spacetime, there would be no point in having a brain.



[;)]



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